Conflictus Gallicus

Lit. 'the Gallic (French) way of fighting or combat'. The "tournament first emerged in what today we call France. The term was used by chroniclers such as Ralph Diceto and Roger of Wendover, while Ralph of Coggeshall used the phrase moreFrancorum (in the way of the French). From c.1130 France was the place to go for a young man keen to make a name and money for himself. Indeed, there was almost a professional circuit on which it was possible to make a fortune, and many Englishmen travelled across the Channel for just that reason. -

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

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  • Conflictus Gallicus — Latin for tournaments. They were licensed in England in 1194 by Richard I using rules brought from France …   Medieval glossary

  • Hastilude — Jousting in a *tournament, not necessarily with hostility or intention to harm, although it remained very dangerous. It was carried on as a serious sport at which *prowess was displayed and applauded. In 1388, Henry Knighton (d. 1396) recorded in …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Melee — A kind of mock battle between sides of armed horsemen. Such melees took place in the 12c and were held in open spaces and to all intents and purposes were pitched battles. There was no set area of conflict; the open fields between villages were… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Tournaments — Introduced to England as *Conflictus Gallicus, a tournament was a somewhat chaotic affair, known as a * melee from which our use of the word. At first, the melee took place in open countryside, with a large number of knights and their attendants …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Tourney — Introduced to England as *Conflictus Gallicus, a tournament was a somewhat chaotic affair, known as a * melee from which our use of the word. At first, the melee took place in open countryside, with a large number of knights and their attendants …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

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